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Author Topic: Myler Bits...? Pros vs Cons  (Read 1771 times)
MG-P
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« on: December 25, 2010, 09:19:38 PM »

I am considering switching to a Myler bit, probably a loose ring, dee ring or full cheek for my head fussy horse.  Anyone have an opinion on them?  I would stay w the 02, 10 or 32 to stay within dressage regulations. Thx
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Desederada
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« Reply #1 on: December 25, 2010, 10:41:12 PM »

Seriously it all depends on the horse.  Horses with low palates and or thick tongues tend to like them.  I believe the loose ring is the cheapest I would try it in the Comfort snaffle mouthpiece. These bits tend to fit really large so if you can size down 1/4-1/2 inch.  What is it that your horse is doing?
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Sure, horses buck. But often it means they are feeling good.  You should be happy for them.

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snaffle
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« Reply #2 on: December 25, 2010, 10:56:26 PM »

I own the combination bit and 2 western snaffles. I love them.

If you are not too sure which one would work best, call and speak to Dale Myler.
I did.
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Desederada
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« Reply #3 on: December 26, 2010, 01:33:52 AM »

I own the combination bit and 2 western snaffles. I love them.

If you are not too sure which one would work best, call and speak to Dale Myler.
I did.
She limited to what's legal and anything that is legal is going to be very similar.  I think if one of them works they will all work and if it doesn't work , none of them will Cheesy  Would be interested in hearing a little more history with the horse.
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Sure, horses buck. But often it means they are feeling good.  You should be happy for them.

My horse's feet are as swift as rolling thunder
He carries me away from all my fears
And when the world threatens to fall asunder
His mane is there to wipe away my tears.
MG-P
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« Reply #4 on: December 27, 2010, 12:17:56 AM »

Well he is a 7yr old shire/TB cross and doing well at training level dressage.  He will jump anything you put in front of him as well.  I can ride completely on the buckle and he will be long and low, stretches, gets very soft and lofty...it is really beautiful how relaxed, well behaved and responsive to my seat he is...at the buckle.  Our issue comes when I try to take up some contact.  I have soft hands and try to remain as steady as possible, but some days he is behind the bits, some days shakin his head, above the bit...basically avoiding in any way he can.  He just says "NO".  Currently I am using a double jointed thick loose ring snaffle...probably one of the mildest bits around.  I have considered that the thickness may be the issue and simply using a thinner bit would help, but the Myler thing is interesting, yet an expensive trail and error.  I have been looking on line for options, maybe used.  Thnx for the sizing advice.  That will help since he is usually a 5 3/4, which is very difficult to find.  So if a 5 1/2 will work, there are many more options.  Thx
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monizzle
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« Reply #5 on: December 27, 2010, 12:52:48 AM »

I bought one from eBay during the summer for my mare, similar issues with your horse but she would also grind/chomp the bit in frustration. Her tongue is definitely bigger (spills outside of her bars slightly) and she also has a low palette. After a little bit of research I chose the Mullen Mouth with low port mouth and dee ring without hooks. I paid about $25, I searched eBay every couple of days until I found a deal. Personally I would rather school in a bit that my horse is really happy in and change for show if needed, I realize this isn't the best option for everyone. My horse has always been light in the bridle when in shape and fairly accepting of contact. Previously I had ridden in a Robart Pinchless dee ring snaffle, a one jointed dee ring snaffle, a french link dee, a full cheek rubber mouth, and a full cheek french link.

Cons: Cost, possibly restrictions depending on the mouthpiece.
Pros: I love this bit because my horse does! Like a typical mare she is always adamant about her dislikes and likes in life, and it's obvious she likes this bit. She no longer grinds the bit or chews on it in frustration. She has been more willing to accept the bit even though she is out of shape (completely subjective but I still believe it's the bit because she isn't the easiest horse to ride otherwise).
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Desederada
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« Reply #6 on: December 27, 2010, 12:57:29 AM »

I think the 5 3/4 or 5 1/2 will work for your horse.  My horse measures and wears a 6 inch bit and I have two 5 1/2 inch Myler bits that are generous on him.
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Sure, horses buck. But often it means they are feeling good.  You should be happy for them.

My horse's feet are as swift as rolling thunder
He carries me away from all my fears
And when the world threatens to fall asunder
His mane is there to wipe away my tears.
TBchick
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« Reply #7 on: December 27, 2010, 06:14:43 PM »

I love my MB 02~ so does my mare!
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coley1
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« Reply #8 on: December 29, 2010, 07:16:40 PM »

I have the MB 02 as well and absolutely love it.  As you stated it is dressage legal as well.  My horse used to be extremely heavy in the mouth and just constantly pulling and this bit helped a lot along with some different training methods.  I'm not one to jump on bit bandwagons and have always stuck with either fat snaffles or french link training bits, but my trainer suggested this one and I was willing to try anything at that point.  They are a little pricey, but way worth it in the long run.
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eventrider
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« Reply #9 on: December 29, 2010, 07:31:38 PM »

Maybe something softer like a rubber.  Seems if he is evading he is uncomfortable with the metal.  A thinner bit is harsher.  I know sometimes people don't understand that.  Would you rather hold a piece of soft rope in your mouth or a wire?   I found that sometimes something as simple as wrapping the bit with some latex (can be found in small rolls at tack shops) will encourage the horse to accept contact and chew on the bit.

Just a thought.
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Meredith & Mlark
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« Reply #10 on: December 29, 2010, 07:48:06 PM »

I tried about 8 bits on my Haf until I tried a Myler. He and my old Paint horse both seemed to prefer it over other bits. I tried the Myler first on my fatter mouthed Paint because someone had suggested it for fat tongued/low palate horses.

My only gripe is that I have the D-ring. It too easily swivels forward (making a backwards dee) and the D's are HUGE. But whatever, happy Haf equals happy me.
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monizzle
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« Reply #11 on: December 29, 2010, 08:29:01 PM »

Thinner mouth doesn't always equal harsher just has rubber doesn't always equal milder...ask any fat tongued, low palette horse.
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eventrider
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« Reply #12 on: December 29, 2010, 10:31:37 PM »

Thinner mouth doesn't always equal harsher just has rubber doesn't always equal milder...ask any fat tongued, low palette horse.
I didn't intend to imply that for ALL horses.  Just a general observation over my 35+ years.
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Your horse is your partner.  Treat him as such.
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